Vaccination Advice

Dr Yiannis Ioannou is a London based private paediatrician who offers vaccinations for children and babies including all immunisations recommended for children living in the UK and international immunisation schedules.

You can find all the latest information on child vaccinations below.

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Sample Vaccine Schedule

Highlighted vaccines are not routinely offered to all children on UK vaccination schedule

AGE VACCINE TRADE NAME ROUTE
From 4 weeks or after newborn screening results available BCG Intradermal
8 weeks Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio,
Haemophilus influenza type b, hepatitis B
(DTaP/IPV/Hib/Hep B)
Infanrix Hexa Injection
Meningococcal B Bexsero Injection
Rotavirus Rotarix Oral drops
12 weeks Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio,
Haemophilus influenza type b, hepatitis B
(DTaP/IPV/Hib/Hep B)
Infanrix Hexa Injection
Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV) Prevenar 13 Injection
Rotavirus Rotarix Oral drops
16 weeks Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio,
Haemophilus influenza type b, hepatitis B
(DTaP/IPV/Hib/Hep B)
Infanrix Hexa Injection
Meningococcal B Bexsero Injection
20 weeks Meningococcal C NeisVac C Injection
Pneumococcal Prevenar 13 Injection
From 6 Months Influenza vaccine inactivated 2nd dose due after 4 weeks Injection
Influenza vaccine inactivated 2nd dose Injection
12 Months
(two injections per visit over 2-4 weeks)
Haemophilus influenzae type B
Meningococcal C
Menitorix Injection
Measles, Mumps & Rubella MMR Vaxpro or MMR Priorix Injection
Meningococcal B Bexsero Injection
Pneumococcal Prevenar 13 Injection
From 1 year (aim for 13-14 months) Varicella (Chicken Pox) Varivax Injection
Hepatitis A Havrix Junior or Vaqta Paediatric Injection
Varicella (Chicken Pox) (2nd dose – minimum 4 weeks after 1st dose) Varivax Injection
Hepatitis A (2nd dose – minimum 6 months after 1st dose) Havrix Junior or Vaqta Paediatric Injection
2 years to 18 years Annual Nasal Flu Vaccine
Live attenuated
Fluenz Tetra Nasal Spray
3 years 4 months Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Poliomyelitis Repevax or Boostrix IPV Injection
Measles, Mumps & Rubella MMR Vaxpro or MMR Priorix Injection
12 years Cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 and genital warts caused by types 6 and 11 Gardasil 1st dose Injection
13 years Cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 and genital warts caused by types 6 and 11 Gardasil 2nd dose Injection
14 years Tetanus, Diptheria, Poliomyelitis Td/IPV Revaxis Injection
Meningococcal serogroup ACWY Menveo or Nimenrix Injection
Other Hepatitis A and B combined (Available for over 1 year olds)

(Three doses needed, 2nd dose 1 month after 1st dose and 3rd dose 5 months after 2nd dose.)

Twinrix Injection
Additional travel vaccinations including typhoid and rabies available on request

Vaccine FAQs

A vaccine is a type of medicine that is able to combat diseases which the body has not come into contact with before, by training the immune system. A vaccine can prevent disease but is not used for treatment after you have caught a disease.

Today, immunisation provided by vaccinations is an essential part of primary health care.

In the UK, a number of vaccinations for infants will be administered at 8, 12 and 16 weeks, and then at 1 year. These vaccinations comprise the immunisation schedule for infants in the UK.
These vaccinations include:

  • 6-in-1 – which protects against diphtheria, hepatitis B, haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), polio, tetanus, and whooping cough.
  • Meningitis B and C – which protects against sepsis and meningitis.
  • MMR – which protects against mumps, measles and rubella.
  • PCV – which protects against pneumococcal infections that can cause meningitis, pneumonia and sepsis.
  • Rotavirus drops – which protects against the rotavirus infection that leads to diarrhoea and vomiting.

You might be concerned that vaccinations could weaken your child’s immune system, but the opposite is the case. Infants’ immune systems are constantly stimulated and exposed to external stimuli from birth. Vaccinations are an additional stimulus against specific illnesses, leading to protection against these illnesses. Many of the illnesses are rarely seen now due to the success of vaccinations. Infants’ immune systems are very capable of coping with multiple vaccinations.

This is something you needn’t be concerned about. Having multiple vaccinations at the same time is safe. Vaccines can be spaced out and timings varied, but there are no concerns with having multiple vaccines in one visit. Some vaccine injections cover multiple illnesses with a single injection, meaning fewer injections are required overall.

Mild reactions to vaccinations are common. In most cases, these reactions include fever, swelling, redness and tenderness at the injection site and are not considered to be serious. In most cases, these reactions are noticeable in the hours after the injection was given, and settle within a day or two. Pain relief medications such as paracetamol can be given to ease symptoms. Dosing instructions should be followed for each medication. More serious reactions including allergic reactions are very rare.

Ideally the vaccine is given during the first year and can be given any time from 4 weeks of age or after newborn screening results are available.

0207 390 8045 Book a Consultation